'Outsiders' is a kind of portrait of London, of parallel experiences/existences, isolation and how housing, community and a sense of belonging are multiplicatively connected. 

Please see here for more details: https://vimeo.com/162405301


'Wherever I Lay my Hat' (2014), explores issues connected to housing, equality and community through using Bathos. I embody the character Charlene Chaplin- a pregnant young woman camping outside of the demolished Heygate Estate in Peckham (a site that once housed 3,000 people). The film references the slapstick comedy of Charlie Chaplin's 'The Vagabond' (1916) to highlight contemporary issues connected with poverty, inequality and social stereotyping. Charlene's tent is a shelter that becomes a dress, symbolising how a place to live is both a site of protection and deeply connected to a sense of belonging and therefore identity. The film was made for a Pop- Up gallery and activist centre on Wells Way in Peckham and was inspired by the 'Campmuters' (Christian Koch, The Evening Standard) in neighbouring Burgess park.


In 'George Makes progress on the farm' (2014), a Londoner learns to reverse a 1950's Yugoslavian made tractor through a field in rural Slovenia. This films plays with ideas of progress by placing a city dweller from a 'developed' capital city in a rural context where she lacks the necessary skills in food production in order to survive. It also challenges the chauvinistic 'joke' that women are inferior drivers and unable to engage in heavy manual labour. George's ability to adapt quickly to both of these challenges directly confronts these misconceptions.


In 'Crocodile Tears' (2014) I invited people in Skofja Loka, Slovenia to place their head into a box containing chopped onions. A fan at the other end of the box blows the onion scent into their eyes and a lamp illuminates their faces. The result is a record of false emotions. The illuminated faces are like crying icons yet they are both laughing and crying. The music is 'Casta Diva' from Bellini's opera 'Norma' (sung here by Maria Callas) and it it's Norma's outpouring when she realises that she has been betrayed by her lover. It is a technically difficult piece to sing and the singer must train her voice and stage performance in order to convince the audience of her emotional turmoil. Crocodile Tears therefore explores the disjuncture between the internal, emotional realm and public persona.


'With these hands' (2014) features hands working together like a heart.  A visual metaphor for the essential functioning of the body, these hands also imply that there is more to survival than just mechanics. In referencing the heart, the movement of the hands opens questions regarding what it means to work, what it means to work in unity and what it is to love. This piece therefore explores the mechanics and meaning of love, of human relationships and creativity.


In 'Shadow drawing' (2014) Evelina Hägglund and I attempt to catch both our own and one another’s shadows. Filmed from above to show the 'canvass’ we worked on, the action of drawing these shadows is a metaphor for making artwork itself- the attempt to pin down an experience or sublime moment which is fleeting and in transitory. It also alludes to memory, human relationships and the futile urge to capture the shadows of the past. 


In the little sketch piece, 'Love's Limit' (2014) the condom is inflated towards the camera lens in a banal and un-erotic manner. When the condom reaches it's full capacity, the lens goes blurry and the air is sucked back to the start position. Both a metaphor for the experience of falling in love (experiencing clouded vision and emotional deflation), the condom is a comic metaphor- connoting a self-generated erection. 'Love's Limit' acknowledges that everything is temporal and that even if emotions are elated and experiences are looped we are never the same afterwards. 


Leave 'em laughing 2014

Electrical potential